Tuesday, September 25, 2007

As Wooing Withers

He’s intimidated by your career, by your wants, by your ambition, by your fortitude, by your strength—even though he says he “only wants the best for you.”

He needs you to coddle him—day and night—because he’s “sensitive.” According to dictionary.com, “sensitive” means, among other things: 1.) aware of and responsive to the feelings of others. 2.) readily or excessively affected by external agencies or influences. Unfortunately, you’re dying for the former; he’s offering only the latter, as his manhood fractures at the slightest criticism, resistance, or disapproval.

Truth be told, in lieu of a mate or equal, you’ve unknowingly become your lover’s surrogate mother. Yeah, the new millennium man is a sniffling, pseudo-sensitive, insecure, modern male drip.

And you’ve landed yourself a ripe one.

You scratch your head and say, “Nellie, why is there no chivalry left in the world today?”

I exhale a mighty sigh and roll my eyes. “Why is there no chivalry in the world today, luv? Because, there are no real men left in the world today…

"Except in fiction.”

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If you enjoy strong-but-feminine women, sexy love stories, hot romance stories, romantic fiction, romance novels, sensual fiction, women's fiction, sentimental fiction, great novellas, award-winning fiction, Nicholas Sparks, Nora Roberts, or Richard Paul Evans, you can read chapter five of Nelson's Bronte Prize-winning novella, Bee Balms & Burgundy, right now for free HERE. (See for yourself why it beat out Nicholas Sparks, Nora Roberts, and Richard Paul Evans, among others, for the title of "North America's Best Love Story of the Year." [Bronte Prize results are HERE.])


Monday, September 17, 2007

Sacrifice the "Sacrifice"

A sensual encounter is a wonderful metaphor for the manner in which society, as a whole, should work.

I’m not, nor will I ever be, a supporter of collectivism; it’s adolescent; it’s “peer-pressure” driven, much like high school. Individualism is our true nature; Darwinism does hold water.

Now, in sex—the way it’s supposed to be—there’s a common goal serving the mutual benefit of both individuals. Even the woman that will do anything to please her man, the one that will go forty ways from Sunday and from head to toe for the sake of her guy, is doing such so that she will, in return, be loved, adored, and appreciated. Just like the worst sex you'll ever have, the best sensual encounters too are completely selfish—they’re always selfish.

So, forget the tired term “sacrifice” when discussing "great" relationships; the term is, in matters of love, rancid bromide, at best. Truth be told, love, sex, and romance are—indirectly a times, perhaps—completely selfish...just like philanthropy is completely selfish. "Philanthropy, Nellie?" you say. Absolutely! The philanthropist only gives because it makes him/her feel good, perhaps even “worthy.” He/she might even offer his/her charity for no other reason than public recognition. Philanthropy’s actual root is selfishness. So too is the core of any sensual encounter, no matter how utterly satiating it may be for both participating souls.

It has to be that way. Why? When you and I both have something at stake—a need, a want, a burning desire—then we can best serve one another. If he/she gives you the orgasm of your life, if he/she makes you feel like a god or goddess via his/her affection and adoration, you’re going to return the gesture two-fold. Why? Because you want him/her to stick around and do it time and time again; it’s in your best interest to do so.

“Sacrifice” is sorely overrated. It may hold a relationship together on the surface, but it doesn’t satisfy both parties. And, if you’re not really satisfied, then what’s the point of the "relationship"???

When you have no incentive, when you’re doing everything simply for the collective cause, there’s no reason, there’s no purpose, and there’s absolutely no passion in it all.

And, really, what’s sensuality without passion???

Nada.

Till next week...

Peace & Luv

NP

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If you enjoy strong-but-feminine women, sexy love stories, hot romance stories, romantic fiction, romance novels, sensual fiction, women's fiction, sentimental fiction, great novellas, award-winning fiction, Nicholas Sparks, Nora Roberts, or Richard Paul Evans, you can read chapter four of Nelson's Bronte Prize-winning novella, Bee Balms & Burgundy, right now for free HERE. (See for yourself why it beat out Nicholas Sparks, Nora Roberts, and Richard Paul Evans, among others, for the title of "North America's Best Love Story of the Year." [Bronte Prize results are HERE.])

Tuesday, September 11, 2007

Lilly, the Construction Worker

Who was the first and/or most influential feminist in American history?

Was it Roe vs. Wade pioneer-turned Born-again Christian Norma Leah McCorvey?

Was it Hippy Chick and former WAA Director Gloria Steinem?

Was it former Goldwater groupie-turned-First Lady-turned-Senator Hilary Rodham Clinton?

Perhaps we need to travel back in time a bit further; was it the venerable socialite Elizabeth Stanton and her Declaration of Sentiment?

I offer you a resounding “no”…to all of the above.

The first and most influential feminist in American history furthered women’s rights while she dared to call two of the most brilliant male minds of her time “best friends” as well. How pertinent was she? By the time Elizabeth Stanton’s Declaration of Sentiment was published and signed, America’s first and most important feminist had already lived 95% of her life, and she’d already loved, worked, spoke her piece, and changed the American woman’s destiny for the better—forever.

She wrote with uncanny eloquence, as well as anyone on American soil. She spoke with clarity and conviction, in a time when women simply weren’t permitted to do such. She thought in concise and intelligent manner, alongside the greatest American male minds of the day. She furthered the cause of all women on U.S. soil less hostility and armed with relentless tact.

So who was she? Well, those two aforementioned “best friends” just happen to be Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau…

And that extraordinary woman—America’s first and most influential feminist—happens to be…

Transcendentalist and Editor of The Dial Margaret Fuller.

Till next time...

NP

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If you enjoy strong-but-feminine women, sexy love stories, hot romance stories, romantic fiction, romance novels, sensual fiction, women's fiction, sentimental fiction, great novellas, award-winning fiction, Nicholas Sparks, Nora Roberts, or Richard Paul Evans, you can read chapter three of Nelson's Bronte Prize-winning novella, Bee Balms & Burgundy, right now for free HERE. (See for yourself why it beat out Nicholas Sparks, Nora Roberts, and Richard Paul Evans, among others, for the title of "North America's Best Love Story of the Year." [Bronte Prize results are HERE.])

Thursday, September 6, 2007

Liquid Love

This delightful chocolate shake recipe is designed to "caress you from the inside out." And, keep in mind, it's a raw food recipe, so it's completely healthy for you. In fact, you're not only stirring your love nature with this authentic chocolate smoothie, but—believe it or not—you're actually detoxifying your body as well!

You’ll need a blender. Then, place the following items in the blender:


• Three Bananas
• Five teaspoons Raw Cacao Powder (add more if need be)
• Two tablespoons Maca
• One cup Goji Berries
• One cup Strawberries
• 16 oz. Purified/Spring Water
• Blend then chill in blender pitcher
• When properly chilled, pull from fridge and blend for ten seconds
• Serve

Then, drink while you read a great love story!

Till next time...

Peace & Luv

NP

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If you enjoy strong-but-feminine women, sexy love stories, hot romance stories, romantic fiction, romance novels, sensual fiction, women's fiction, sentimental fiction, great novellas, award-winning fiction, Nicholas Sparks, Nora Roberts, or Richard Paul Evans, you can read chapter two of Nelson's Bronte Prize-winning novella, Bee Balms & Burgundy, right now for free HERE. (See for yourself why it beat out Nicholas Sparks, Nora Roberts, and Richard Paul Evans, among others, for the title of "North America's Best Love Story of the Year." [Bronte Prize results are HERE.])